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Canada

When your closet smell like Lysol wipes, waiting for another wave of panic. Yet the smell alone, reminds you how to panic. Refreshing only an on-going memory.

Submitted by: Digital BFA

Materials: Panic Buttons, Uncertainty, Lysol wipes and the overwhelming scent of over-stimulation.

Closet. Location. Home.

Categories
Canada

Wailing

Submitted by: Mogu

Materials: Digital images, digital video, digital sound - cello.

This piece starts out with the soothing effect of water sounds and images cascading down a wall. Soon the music enters and escalates into wailing, created with a digital cello. The piece represents the places in our minds that many can go to as they lose connection with people and are left alone with themselves.

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Canada

Egbert’s first day of school!

Submitted by: Rosamund

Materials: Eggplant, STM bus

Eggplant enjoying his city bus ride and keeping me company . . . I’d like to blame my current drift towards the limits of cultural normality on months of social isolation, but I suspect I have always been like this.

Categories
Canada

Staycation: Day 138

Submitted by: Rosamund

Materials: Photograph

Photograph

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Canada

Say it ain’t so

Submitted by: Rosamund

Materials: Plastic, concrete, desperation and dashed hopes

Found outside the Laurier Metro entrance

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Canada

Assomption of Survival

Submitted by: Celina Loyer – Cree Métis

Materials: Traditionally finger woven acrylic yarn

Our fur trade ancestors used the sash as a tool: a belt, a rope, a tumpline. With this mask, the sash is transformed into our tool of survival during the pandemic. Based on the ancient Assomption ceinture flechée pattern and colours, the unique shape of this mask springs from creativity and necessity. Completely woven by hand, sashes usually remain the same width. Shaping the sash to fit the face requires ingenuity and perseverance.

The sash is not perfect – changes in thread tension create imperfections in the weave. As we progress through the stages of the pandemic, tension affects people too, revealing flaws and inspiring adaptation of old ways to a new normal.

Our people have faced pandemic before: smallpox, influenza, TB. Yet we persevere. The means to survival can feel heavy or stifling, yet we will continue to do what is necessary to ensure our culture thrives.

Just breathe.

Images: Veridian Photography
Model: Jessie Loyer

This mask was created for the Breathe community Facebook group – A collection of traditionally crafted masks demonstrating resiliency through 21st century pandemic.

Categories
Canada

Andromeda Strain

Submitted by: Dan

Materials: Oil on panel

It started as the COVID-19 virus, but as the painting developed it got more complex, transforming into a nightmare space-borne virus capable of un-terra-forming the earth. Maybe a way of coping with the anxiety of the unknown? Imagine it worse to make it better?

Categories
Canada

Every Bead a Breath

Submitted by: Adele ᒪᐢᑿᓱᐏᐢᑵᐤ Arseneau

Materials:

Handmade Mask by Adele maskwasowiskwew Arseneau

As an indigenous woman, I’ve largely passed through this existence feeling like I have no voice. Most of my art has been focused on creating around the endangered stories of others, to put them up on the proverbial soapbox, making them personable and real. It never occurred to me to tell my own story, with its roots so intertwined with this land now called Canada. All of my portrait carvings reflect this journey, with most of them only having the suggestion of a mouth. My hands do the speaking as they create the pieces I make. Using everything I am given, like my kohkoms before me. Appreciating the materials, and the memories they bring. Each piece is like a reflection, capturing a moment in my life. Beading my anxiety away, each bead a breathe. Each stitch sewing me back into my culture, bringing with it remembering, intertwining me with my roots, making me stronger and more whole. Several elements come from family stories, the arrow sash – to remember how my family stood alongside One Arrow and his Nation before the territories became Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Buffalo hide to remember the bull taken at Pink Mountain where my father was Captain of the Hunt. Abalone buttons passed down through the family from mother to daughter, traded from the coast to the prairies, and now returned. Horsehair and flower beadwork to honor my nehiyaw mother and my Métis father. Ocean Jasper and the blue palette – as air and water walk hand in hand and we cannot live without either. Everything has a place in this world, like beads – we do best when we are put where we can shine. It’s all part of a larger picture, this is how something small can impact something larger than ourselves. We all need to tell our stories because someone out there needs to hear them.

Submitted as part of Breathe, curated by Nathalie Bertin and Lisa Shepherd.

Adele maskwasowiskwew Arseneau, is an emerging nehiyaw (Cree) – Métis visual artist. Creating traditional and contemporary beadwork, along with carving red and yellow cedar – she tells stories to engage audiences around social and environmental issues. This is her language and these are her stories.

This mask was created for the Breathe community Facebook group – A collection of traditionally crafted masks demonstrating resiliency through 21st century pandemic.

Categories
Canada

Patience

Submitted by: Kishory Devine

Materials: Cotton threads, peaceful thoughts, and a happy heart

Safe place

Categories
Canada

Tree root mask

Submitted by: Amanda

Materials: Faux suede, beads, shoe strings

Researchers and psychologists have said for years that humans are social creatures, and we have an innate need to be around other people. Studies show that people who are more connected with others are healthier and happier overall. Psysical distancing is not a natural or pleasant behavior. I asked my children what they’ll remember most about this pandemic, and to my surprise they all answered the same thing- just being alone. We talked about why we’re apart from our friends and community, but how we’re also together. The conversation ultimately made me think of trees. Trees appear to stand alone and apart, but their roots run deep and the truth is that they cooperate and communicate all the time. No matter how it may appear we’re never truly alone, because deep down we’re a community that cares about each other. We’re all in this together.

This mask was created for the Breathe community Facebook group – A collection of traditionally crafted masks demonstrating resiliency through 21st century pandemic.